Michelle Obama recruited to run for Senate, Chicago mayor

First lady Michelle Obama’s star status on the 2016 campaign trail is prompting top Democrats back home in Illinois to ready an effort to recruit her to run for the Senate or mayor of Chicago.

Should she run and win, Obama would join only Hillary Rodham Clinton in the rare class of former first ladies to swap out the “volunteer” public service job for an elected position.

The burgeoning effort comes despite Obama’s inclination to leave elective politics behind when her husband’s two terms are up in January, according to National Journal.

ALSO READ   Secret of looking younger revealed: Half of us have an 'ageing gene' and it affects our skin as much as smoking

“There is no per­son in polit­ics that I think Demo­crats, in­de­pend­ents, and Re­pub­lic­ans would love to see take on pub­lic ser­vice more than the first lady,” Thomas Bowen, a former top aide to Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, told NJ’s Karyn Bruggeman.

He said he’d encourage her to run. “The an­swer is yes. We would en­cour­age her and put pres­sure on her,” said Bowen, adding, “But we are also kind of real­ist­ic in our ex­pect­a­tions and take her at her word that it’s not something she wants to do right now. That doesn’t mean it won’t ever be an op­tion in the fu­ture, and we will wait faith­fully for her.”

ALSO READ   A Woman's Sexual Needs In Pregnancy & How To Satisfy Them

According to the report, Emanuel’s seat could open in 2019, and Sen. Dick Durbin is considering a gubernatorial bid in 2018.

“Ob­vi­ously she’d be qual­i­fied to run for just about any of­fice up and down the tick­et, but I think she has con­sist­ently talked about not hav­ing any in­terest in polit­ic­al of­fice,” Illinois Democratic Party Spokesman Steve Brown said.

The Obama’s will remain in the public eye when they leave the White House because they will be staying in Washington where their daughter will be wrapping up high school.

ALSO READ   Thailand votes on new constitution that could dilute democracy

On Monday, the president said that he and his wife will stay involved in policy, along with his vice president.

“I’m looking forward to not only laying the groundwork for the next administration to pick up the baton and run with it, but I know Joe and Jill and I and Michelle will all continue to be involved after we’ve left this office in making sure that this works,” said Obama.